Knowledge Capital & Personal Development

Since more than 3/4 of the top-developed nation’s working population are engaged in the service sectors, the intellectual capital and varying levels of development of these people are a major factor in a nation’s competitiveness.

And so it is between competing firms.  They do similar things, with the same people, for similar clients, using similar technology at more or less the same prices.  However, data shows that there are wide differences in performance between competing firms.  Why is this?  What is the key factor that is different?

A business is comprised of a group of people who have come together to play a specific role in the success of the business.  If the business is to grow, then its people must grow.  If the people are small-minded, unmotivated and not very creative – then the business will reflect this.

On the other hand, if the team members see themselves as vital, contributing, and able to excel, then the business will reflect this also.  Many organizations invest time and money in the professional development of their people; however, they neglect their team’s personal development.

Investing in the ongoing personal development and training of your team is one of the best investments you can make.  If someone makes $50,000 a year and can generate you $500,000 in value, why not take this person and increase their skill, ability, talent, attitude and education, so that they can add a million dollars in value?

A $50,000 investment that brings a $1 million return is a very, very valuable asset.  There is no better investment that companies can make than in the education and development of their own people.

Areas of personal development include:

  • Relationship skills
  • Interpersonal communication skills
  • Emotional health and self-esteem
  • Personal responsibility
  • Self-motivation
  • Financial intelligence
  • Personal Leadership

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© Goldzone Education. All rights reserved.

Q&A > What Does It Mean To CONFRONT?

Here is the definition of Confront:

CONFRONT: n. 1. An action of being able to face without flinching or avoiding. 2. The ability to be there comfortably and perceive.

So we see that to confront means to be able to see what is there, comfortably without flinching, wanting to withdraw or running away. Often, to fully understand a word, it is easier to look at the opposite. What does “non-confront” mean? It simply means the inability to see what is there. An inability to face something.

Why can’t we confront something? Because to confront means PAIN. It is too painful to view so we withdraw and refuse to look at the area.

Notice that the definition describes confront as an ability? It isn’t something you do, it is an ability that we develop over time. The ability to see more and more of the truth.

There is also what is call “low-confront” which is where a person can confront a little, can see a little of the truth of what is there… But not all of it.

How do you improve your ability to confront? The same way you improve any other ability, focus, attention and practice. And, dealing with the pain that had you not confronting the area in the first place.

As you can see, the ability to confront is directly connected to the ability to handle change. If a person can’t confront the future, or the unknown… Then they will stay in their comfort zone, and stuck in the past.

There are a whole set of processes to assist anyone in improving their ability to confront. These are available as part of the Optima Program.

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© Goldzone Education. All rights reserved.

The Wise Man, the Goddess and the Fragment

An adult bedtime story…

Once upon a time there was a wise man.  This wise man travelled the world exploring new places and learning the mysteries of life.  One day without warning, and as if by magic, the wise man forgot who he was.  He forgot that there is more to life than power, money, sex and the relentless pursuit of success.  He forgot his wisdom.  He forgot his teachers.  He forgot the examples he had seen.  He forgot the lessons he had learned.  He forgot where he had come from.  This once wise man disowned himself.  He left his seat at the table, the table of the gods.

After a while the wise man tried to rediscover himself.  But, how would he do it?  So he tested everything he knew to be true.  He tried it all out on himself.  He lied, he cheated, he stole.  He doubted himself.  He doubted others.  And in the process, he began to rediscover himself.  Progress was slow and he wanted to be fast…  “Give me the fast-track,” he demanded.  But to whom was he making these demands?  From whom and from where did he expect the answers to come?

And then one day he ran into a fragment of himself.

This fragment was a broke-ass, unethical blamer.  This fragment was a nobody trying to be somebody.  People rejected him.  Money rejected him.  And the wise man felt sorry for him.  The wise man decided to help him.  But the unethical blamer said one thing, and did another.

In his quest to render assistance, the wise man began to fight with the unethical blamer.  He tried to convince him.  He was right, no matter what.  And the wise man (not so wise now) tried to prove that he was right and the fragment was wrong.

If only he could refute one more point.  Surely then.  Surely he would see reason? After all, was it not completely logical?  This fragment was so precocious, so irrational, so emotional, so fixated on being right.  But he was so wrong.  The wise man was sure of himself.

How dare he! The wise man raged…  does he not know WHO I AM? After all, he was the wise man.

No, the fragment could only see another fragment.  He could not see the wise man.  For the wise man could not see himself.  All the wise man could see was the fragment within him.

Then the goddess whispered to the wise man, “Transform the fragments into the whole.” For the goddess could see the wise man, and the fragments and the fragment reflection.  For his part, the wise man could not see the goddess, he could only see fragments.  This is because he had forgotten himself.

The wise man thought to himself, “I am nothing but a fragment, like all the other fragments,” and he gave up on himself and accepted his royal fragmentedness.

But the goddess did not give up.

The goddess knew all the fragments where beautiful and incomplete pieces of the wonderful, magnificent and awesome whole.  The goddess refused to give up and reminded the wise man that he was not a fragment.  But the wise man insisted on pretending he was a fragment.  And whenever the goddess demanded more from him, he wished the goddess dead.  He hated the goddess.  He wanted to run away from her.  After all, she reminded him of everything he had forgotten.

But the goddess was like nothing else.  She was like no one else.  She was…  spellbinding.  In her presence the wise man felt feelings he had long forgotten that were intoxicating.  He loved her.  He hated her.  He loathed himself.

He had, after all, forgotten himself.  He was not only a fragment, but was working night and day tirelessly to be the king of all the fragments.  Surely then.  Surely then.

You don’t become a god by killing a goddess.  The mere thought itself creates more fragments, let alone actually trying to do it.

The words of the goddess haunted the wise man.  “Own thyself.  You are not a fragment.  You are a wise man.  You are only seeing a fragment of yourself when you fight with the other fragments.”

And the wise man began to remember.  “I, too, can help other fragments become whole, but I can’t do this as a fragment.”

“Every fragment I fight with is a reflection of my own fragmentedness.”

“I cannot help other fragments, unless I, too, become whole and remember that I am a wise man, a whole, a fragmented god.”

“I remember. I was born in the stars.”

“I am made up of the same materials as all the stars.”

And then the wise man became wiser.  He transformed his fragments.  He sought out his fragments wherever he could find them…  and transformed all the pieces into a whole.

Then he became a great teacher.  A teacher of men.  An example to all the other fragments.

The wise man returned to his seat at the table with all the other gods.  Then he could finally see the goddess and his eyes opened to all the other gods sitting at the same table…

— The End —

© Goldzone Education. All rights reserved.

ZONE TIPS > Your Feelings Are Not Reliable

Feelings are important to our experience of living as human beings. It is said that all mammals have some feelings; however, as human beings we have the widest range of feelings. Beyond the basic triad of pain, pleasure and numb, we have a lot of nuances to describe how we feel at any given moment — about everything we experience.

When it comes to making decisions, even the most rational, seemingly emotionless decision-makers are, unbeknownst to them, influenced by their feelings — even if they are not consciously aware of them. Even no feeling is a feeling.

Because of past things that have happened to us (both real and imagined) we tend to have conflicting emotions, as well as stacks of misplaced emotions, that get projected onto items, areas, subjects and people that they do not belong to.

If we make decisions based on how we feel, we will often get ourselves into trouble. On the other hand if we ignore how we feel, and make decisions that are based on the ultimate rational logic, we will also get into trouble. So the optimum decision-making method is to balance both rational and emotional factors to arrive at the best outcome possible under the circumstances.

When it comes to working towards a goal or intended outcome, we can be succeeding and making progress, and yet our emotions could be indicating that nothing is working and we are going to fail!  The opposite is also true, where we are doing poorly and yet feel on top of the world.  Most people would think this is not possible, and that surely when going up, one would feel up, and when going down, one would have that dreaded sinking feeling. For a variety of reasons, our emotions get mixed up and we feel the wrong thing at the wrong time.  This leads us to make incorrect assessments and assumptions.

That sounds scary, so what do we do about it? The fastest, easiest and most reliable thing to do is to use statistics and measurements to track your progress.  Then there is no emotion involved and it is simply a matter of “What does the stat show”? An analogy for this is when a pilot is flying a plane in bad weather when they cannot see the horizon. The pilot’s feelings and sense of direction can get so confused by the lack of visual stimuli, that up feels like down and down can feel like up… yikes! How does a pilot handle this phenomena? They fly by instruments.  So, rather than relying on your feelings for your decision-making and assessment of how you are doing, look to your instruments — otherwise known as statistics.

Here are just some statistics that you could measure, record and plot on a graph to show progress and the trend over time (in no particular order):

  1. net worth
  2. bank balance
  3. weight
  4. body measurements
  5. mood level
  6. number of fights with people
  7. days without a fight
  8. number of magic moments
  9. income
  10. expenses
  11. blood pressure
  12. depressed days
  13. inspired days
  14. energy level
  15. total debt
  16. total assets
  17. days you exercise
  18. dates of sexual activity
  19. number of headaches
  20. dollars invested

This list is by no means exhaustive; there are many more items you could track statistics on. We recommend you make your own list and begin tracking stats!

BTW, some people will have feelings about stats and the accountability that comes with them.  These feelings may get in the way of taking action…

© Goldzone Education. All rights reserved.

Why Should I Invest in Personal Development?

This question is often asked by two different types of people:

  1. People who are aggressively pursuing their goals and are focused on bottom line returns.
  2. People who are doing the minimum, are disinterested and taking what life gives them.

For the rest of us, it seems obvious that by investing in ourselves, our skills, our knowledge and our abilities, that we will advance in life and get more of what we want.

But this is not so obvious to most people.

Many people are disconnected from the fact that an investment in oneself will give a return on investment that continues throughout one’s entire life.

Here are some of the tangible benefits:

  • Enhanced quality of life
  • Increased income
  • Greater career opportunities
  • Enhanced health
  • Greater self-expression

What does investing in oneself look like?

Here are some examples:

  • Buying new clothes
  • Developing new knowledge through books, seminars, etc.
  • Enhancing one’s skills
  • Enjoying experiences that are memorable

© Goldzone Education. All rights reserved.

Your Inner-Critic

Have you ever made a mistake, then a split-second later felt the sting of dread, shame, and disapproval followed by a critical inner voice that judges and finds fault with what you have done?

Both the feeling and the voice are manifestations of what is known as your “Inner-Critic.” This article explores what is an Inner-Critic, how it works, where it came from and how to free oneself once and for all of this sabotaging mechanism.

Let’s explore the definition in more detail:

INNER:

  1. Situated inside, further in or internal.
  2. Spiritual, mental or emotional.
  3. Private and not expressed or discernible.

CRITIC:

  1. A person who disapproves and expresses their unfavorable view of something.
  2. A person who judges and evaluates or analyzes literary or artistic works, dramatic or musical performances.
  3. A person who tends too readily to make trivial, or harsh judgments; faultfinder.

INNER-CRITIC:

  1. Internal, private voice that disapproves, judges, evaluates and finds fault saying that he or she is bad, wrong, inadequate, worthless, guilty and not good enough.

If you are like most people, your feelings about criticism range from mild dislike, strong dislike to outright hatred for the criticism and the person giving it.

There are two main types of criticism: constructive and destructive. The difference between the two comes down to the intention of the critic. If the critic intends to improve something and delivers their criticism with this in mind, then the criticism is often (not always) received differently than when the intention of the critic is to minimize, tear down or destroy.

Criticism is also known as feedback.

The problem for most people is that they have experienced so much destructive criticism that they can’t tell the difference between the two types. So, they end up reacting to all criticism/feedback and writing it off automatically.

All successful people, public figures, and leaders are subject to both types of criticism. Learning to differentiate between the two types, and allowing oneself to benefit from the criticism/feedback – without taking it personally – is an art and skill developed over time.

More insidious and destructive than any critic you may encounter at work or at home, is the one you take with you on a permanent basis: the one inside your head that is known as the “INNER CRITIC”.

The Inner Critic is that part of yourself that criticizes everything you do, doubts what you do, doesn’t think you are good enough, gives you negative thoughts, is cynical, is never satisfied, and is a perfectionist.

Another term for the Inner Critic is the Inner Villain that plays a destructive game with yourself. Once you have disengaged from dramas with other people, you then have the task of disengaging from your own Villain that is making you a Victim to yourself.

As long as you are busy blaming other people for your feelings and circumstances, your Inner Critic remains invisible to you. So it stands to reason that when you cease blaming others, you will then become aware of your own self-blame, and inner criticism. It is your inner criticism that has you blaming others in the first place.

If you are sensitive to others blaming or criticizing you, then you have a well-developed Inner Critic. It is the Inner Critic that cares what others think about you. It is the Inner Critic that has you feeling hurt by what others say or do.

Once you have dealt with your Inner Critic, you will be less at the effect of other people, and more at cause over all areas of your life.

If you have a fear of rejection, this is a fear born directly from the essence of your Inner Critic.

Technically, the Inner Critic is your shadow self that is you rejecting you. It is found in the depths of your subconscious mind. The opposite of your Inner Critic is self-acceptance, which is called your Inner Cheerleader.

When your Inner Critic is beating you up for a mistake you made, you become unsavory to other people. They feel that you are negative and perhaps toxic, and therefore will be inclined to reject you. Your Inner Critic seduces the worst behavior from people, as it only leaves space for a harmful act or nasty comment. You might as well have a sign on your forehead that says, “Beat me up, reject me.”

It takes a very clear person to see this and not reject you or beat you up. This takes a lot of energy and isn’t fun. So you are no fun to be around (and you can’t stand yourself either.)

So now that we know what the Inner Critic is, how do we deal with it? How do we disengage from it?

The Inner Critic never goes away totally. It always remains in the background… always, and ever listening. So we can disengage from it but never get rid of it totally.

How do you Disengage your Inner Critic?

Well, the first step is to become consciously aware of when your Inner Critic is at play. Once you are aware of it, your task is to accept your Inner Critic. Once you have fully accepted your Inner Critic, you can then accept yourself.

Self-acceptance is the key.

Because two things cannot occupy the same space, the antidote to the Inner Critic is the Inner Cheerleader. So, when you hear negative self-talk from the inner critic, thank it for sharing and counter with positive encouragement from your Inner Cheerleader.

If you are with another person, friend or colleague and you notice your Inner Critic is running you, and you are unable to disengage it, then the best thing to do is take time out until you have it under control. This is responsible behavior and puts you more AT CAUSE.

The ultimate solution to the Inner Critic is to clean slate the area. This means clearing the areas that created your Inner Critic in the first place. Namely, the things that you have done to others, and things others have done to you.

There is no quick fix to this. It is an ongoing journey that you take with yourself.

© Goldzone Education. All rights reserved.

The Ultimate Personal Development

If you continue a lifelong journey of improving and developing yourself, this can only lead to one place – LEADERSHIP. Most people are busy trying to get somewhere – rather than working on becoming someone. As you improve your ability to communicate, to confront difficult situations and people, to postulate future realities… Your ability to lead, persuade and inspire increases in proportion.